1/6/13

Happy New Year everybody!

Theo van Kampen
We celebrated a nice Christmas and New year's eve and of course I made the obligated 'Oliebollen' as well. 
Oliebollen are a traditional fried yeast dough dish from the lowlands. They are traditionally eaten on New Year's Eve in the Netherlands. They are made by dropping a quantity of batter using two spoons in a pan with hot sunflower oil resulting in bake more or less brown spherical donuts.


The origin of this tradition lies at the end of the Middle Ages. Christmas time was the end of the fasting period which begins at 11 November, a reason to celebrate. Oil-cake, made ​​from sustainable materials like beer, yeast, flower and oil (all fresh food was already on) were a nutritious treat.
Nowadays you can buy ready made 'oliebollenmix' (just add warm water and wait 30 minutes to make the dough), heat a cast iron pan with sunflower oil and the result is fabulous! Very tasty oliebollen, easy to digest especially when drinking Prosecco or other sparkling wine together :-)


But what to do with the oliebollenmix that you didn't use? Throwing away is no option and since another tradition is appearing: Driekoningen! (Epiphany) I found another application.
Epiphany is not a particular important celebration over here in Amsterdam but since Nadia, my partner is from the Swiss we always bake in the morning of Epiphany the traditional Driekoningenbrood (Epiphanybread).
Since the basic ingredients for making oliebollen or driekoningenbrood are the same I simply use Oliebollenmix to make the dough for the bread. I let it rise for 1 1/2 hour, heat up the oven until 200 Celsius, hide a bean in one of the compartiments and after 20 minutes the driekoningenbrood is ready.


So in this bread there is a bean hidden and whoever finds it will be the king and the person who is the king, that day is the boss. (The bean in the cake is also derived from heathen customs.)


And guess who found the bean......


This day I am the boss! On the picture The Boss shows the carton donuts mix.

No comments:

Post a Comment